Introduction

 

Every aspect of nature is connected in some way or another. That is why the presence of something new inevitably brings about a change in overall conditions—an aftermath of its interaction with its surroundings.

What the writer means here is the presence of a thing known to us as activated Carbon particles which, if it had existed before living creatures came into existence, would have possibly served as the source of life, similar to what we have now. Like Cells in general, it is microscopic in size.

Though nothing is known as to where life comes from, a look into the condition of the present living creatures, however, gives us the impression that its appearance must have occurred only in one particular period. Scientists estimated that the origin of life took place approximately 3.8 billion years ago.

 

With this in mind, we may perhaps assume that the origin of life was then not evenly spread on the surface of the earth. Rather, it is quite likely that they were located in particularly vast areas, the exact whereabouts of which may never be known.

What the writer is trying to describe here, however, is the presence of the activated Carbon particles, which may have changed due to their interaction with their natural environment. While the activated carbon particles are collecting the components, they also are subject to external pressure waves that compress the material at the center. Those waves known to occur in nature, particularly the Rayleigh waves, which is a result of such condensation of molecules towards the centre of the activated Carbon particles, may lead to the  particles’ being divided. With the presence of the many compounds similar to those found in the Cell, it is quite possible that the activated Carbon particles may have had the ability to develop and multiply itself, the way the present day Cell divides itself.

 

Now why don’t we simply follow every explanation this book has to offer, then profoundly reflect on it, and try to take every advantage of it. However, it is perhaps necessary to remind the reader here that in any attempt to look into the origin of things, it is necessary for us to first realize that anything in its crude state must certainly be definitely simple. This is particularly true of the Cell. For this reason, it is advisable that we not let ourselves be preoccupied with the complexities of the present day Cells.

 

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